Members

Idle Free BC offers resources and support to organizations looking to reduce their idling. We work to help them implement their idling reduction programs and provide recognition to those that achieve their targets.

Who's on Board?

Energy Alternatives Ltd.
City of Burnaby
City of Chilliwack
City of Kamloops
City of Prince George
City of Vancouver
City of Williams Lake
Resort Municipality of Whistler
Town of Gibsons
Richmond Community Challenge
City of New Westminster
City of North Vancouver
District of Central Saanich
Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen
City of Surrey
City of Dawson Creek
Capital Regional District
City of Merritt
City of Vernon
Pemberton
Qualicum Beach
Township of Langley
District of Ucluelet
Village of Pemberton
City of Victoria
Grand Forks
Corporation of Delta
Other Participants


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Energy Alternatives Ltd. has implemented an idle reduction program at its Victoria facility. The program is designed to educate visiting courier companies about the benefits of idle efficiency. Education materials and road signs are used to target specific high traffic areas.

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The City of Burnaby has developed a campaign to increase staff and community awareness of the environmental and health effects of vehicular emissions, and the concrete actions that individuals can take to reduce these. The City’s Idle Reduction Initiative will be conveyed under the larger umbrella of Burnaby’s own DriveSmart Program. The City of Burnaby’s DriveSmart Program will be phased, such that implementation has first occurred within City departments through collaboration with staff, then city-wide through messaging to residents, and finally to parent advisory committees and business groups, including commercial vehicle operators.

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City of Chilliwack

A two-step idle free initiative has been approved by the City of Chilliwack to reduce idling within the City. The intention is to achieve compliance through voluntary measures. “Step one” includes municipal light duty fleet vehicles only. The second step takes the results of “step one” to the community, seeking voluntary involvement from such groups as public schools, driving schools, transit operators, trucking associations, and the general public. The educational campaign will raise awareness about how unnecessary idling contributes to the deterioration our air quality and has negative impacts on our health and our environment.

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City of Kamloops

The City of Kamloops has started an idle-reduction program in its fleet.  They have developed an information and education campaign that focuses on internal and external audiences.  They are using vehicle stickers and signs to promote idle-reduction practices in their community.  

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City of Prince George

The City of Prince George has developed a community-wide Idle Free campaign to help meet the City’s goals around clean air, greenhouse gas reductions, noise reduction and efficient resource use.   The City began with an Idle Free education campaign involving the City fleet and staff, then developed a partnership involving fleets and organizations from around the community including Canfor, College of New Caledonia, Ministry of Environment, Northern Health Authority, Regional District of Fraser Fort George, School District 57 and the University of Northern BC.

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onedayathome.ca

The City of Vancouver has implemented a progressive idling campaign that involves fleet and public awareness/education. The One Day campaign is about taking small steps to make Vancouver the cleanest, greenest, healthiest city in the world.

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City of Williams Lake

The City of Williams Lake has developed an Idle Free program with their fleet, in order to create a healthier work environment, improve air quality and reduce fuel use. This includes an education campaign to remind drivers about the importance of reduced idling, as well as a formal fleet policy that provides guidelines such as appropriate idling times relevant to the climate in both winter and summer.

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The Resort Municipality of Whistler launched its Idle-Free campaign in February. The Campaign incorporates a public education and outreach approach with regular advertisements in the local newspapers and on the radio. Permanent signs will also be strategically placed in idling "hot spots" throughout the community reminding drivers to turn their vehicles off.

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Town of Gibsons

The Town of Gibsons implemented an idle reduction bylaw in September 2005 and they also posted signs in strategic areas (like at the town office and in the area where tour buses park during the summer). Comments about the bylaw have been supportive and we have provided copy of our bylaw to several other communities. Their bylaw is based on a model developed by the GVRD.

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Richmond Community Challenge

The Richmond Community Challenge is a partnership between the City of Richmond, the Richmond School Board, and the Vancouver International Airport Authority. The City of Richmond implemented an idle free program at the City works yard that educates staff about the impacts of idling and asks individuals to turn off their engines. Last fall, the City of Richmond partnered with the Richmond School Board to promote an idle-free pilot project in Richmond high schools. As part of this program, they received a grant from TD Friends of the Environment to create a computerized teaching suitcase to help students convey the myths and facts about idling. The Richmond School Board is currently continuing to develop a district-wide program, including training student ambassadors to implement idle-free campaigns in their schools. The Vancouver International Airport Authority is looking for ways to reduce emissions from their vehicle fleet. They're looking at practical ways to address the factors that lead to excessive idling and working to develop a program to educate staff about the effects of idling as well as prompt staff and the public to turn their engines off.

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City of North Vancouver

The City of North Vancouver recognizes the importance of addressing greenhouse gas emissions, including vehicle idling, and is currently undertaking a review of its greenhouse gas emissions and emission reduction targets. On July 4, 2005, City Council voted to amend the Street and Traffic Bylaw to incorporate regulations related to vehicle idling. The City of North Vancouver has implemented an anti-idling bylaw.

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District of Central Saanich

The District of Central Saanich has an internal anti-idling policy for their municipal fleet vehicles.

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Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen

The Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen has implemented an internal anti-idling policy for their muncipal fleet vehicles.

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City of Surrey

The City of Surrey has recently passed an anti-idling bylaw. Fines of $50 will be applied to enforce the bylaw.

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City of Dawson Creek

As part of Dawson Creek’s Energy Plan, the city is looking at ways to reduce our green house gas emissions. The municipal vehicle fleet of 40+ vehicles is moving towards being an idle-free "green friendly" group, which follows Dawson Creek’s commitment to reduce its energy costs and related emissions and the City’s ongoing efforts to become a visionary community that works together for innovative social, cultural, economic and environmental vitality.

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The Town of Qualicum Beach has adopted a model of leading by example, by targeting it’s own fleet. The town achieved a modest reduction in fuel consumed in 2007. Early in 2008 Qualicum Beach adopted an official idle reduction policy and presented this to municipal staff, and continues to monitor fuel consumption.

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The Township of Langley completed an Anti-Idling Pilot Study in the summer of 2008, to increase awareness of the negative effects of unnecessary vehicle idling, and to influence behaviour change among motorists who idle their vehicles unnecessarily. The Township found that following an education campaign at 4 railroad crossings, the percentage of vehicles that idle had dropped by 41%.

The Township has received $105,000 from Natural Resources Canada’s ecoENERGY Program, to conduct an anti-idling campaign this summer. This campaign will employ 6 idle-reduction ambassadors, who will use the principles of Community-Based Social Marketing, as did the Pilot study, and will collect anti-idling pledges from motorists at “idling hotspots,” such as drive-thrus, recreation centres, and gas stations.

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New Westminster passed an anti-idling bylaw in October 2008, after many hours of hard work by the New Westminster Environmental Partners organization. New Westminster now has educational material on idling readily available on their website.

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Pemberton has a Village Bylaw banning idling for more than 10 minutes.

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The City of Victoria passed an anti-idling bylaw in 2008, and began implementing it through a graduated system of public education, followed by warnings, and finally enforcement via issuing fines for idling infractions in February 2009.

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Grand Forks passed an anti-idling bylaw in 2007. In the summer of 2008, Grand Forks hosted an Idle Reduction Ambassador that engaged in public education and outreach to reduce idling in the community.

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The Corporation of Delta has an internal idling reduction policy for it’s fleet. Starting in February 2008, Delta began its idle free campaign with a workshop, which debunked some of the myths surrounding idling. Delta followed this up by installing 14 street signs at City Hall and city work yards, handing out “Our Fleet is Idle Free” key chains, and “Turn it off” vehicle stickers. Delta has saved over $117,000 in fuel costs, and has improved fuel efficiency by an average of 7% across the fleet. Delta has also spared the atmosphere of approximately 220 metric tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions.

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The City of Vernon adopted an Anti Idling Policy in 2004. Staff education and awareness of the benefits of reduced idling is ongoing. Fleet Services is currently investigating GPS (AVL) Automatic Vehicle Locator technologies to monitor fleet activity to manage the Fleet and is currently testing vehicle engine shutdown technologies designed to limit idle time to 5 minutes, thus reducing fuel consumption. The City is continuing to “right size” the 180 + size Fleet to match the needs of the City operations. Vehicles are replaced with more energy efficient compact units. The City recognizes the challenges in reducing GHG. Sustainability and Travel Plan teams are working to meet carbon reduction goals for 2012.

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